As temperatures rise, conversations regarding skin cancer become quite frequent. However, cancer prevention is a year round task, and visiting your dentist regularly may catch oral cancer early on in the game. The American Dental Association (ADA) , has stated that "… approximately 35,000 new cases of oral cancer are diagnosed each year in the United States. Some 25 percent of those people will die of the disease" and a new dental test can detect oral cancer in its earliest stages.

According to MedicalNewsToday.com, researchers at the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust are working on developing the test. The product will allow dentist to use a brush to harvest cell samples from a patient's oral cavity. The technology is being worked on thanks to funding from a $ 2 million award granted by the USA's National Institutes of Health.

The yet unnamed test is believed to generate an accurate oral cancer diagnosis in twenty minutes or less. Like other current cancer detection methods, at the present time oral cancer can only be confirmed with a biopsy and lab study. Depending on the location and work queue of the labs, getting the results may take time.

When it comes to any type of cancer, early detection is essential to conquering the disease. Tobacco users (both smokers and chewers), heavy drinkers, sun worshipers and those with a history of oral cancer need to always be on high alert for any suspicious changes in their oral cavity. Thankfully there are visual warning signs of oral cancer including:

  • Pain or numbness in mouth
  • Problems speaking, chewing and swallowing
  • Changes in bite or general tooth health
  • Skin discoloration in the mouth especially patches of red or white
  • Sores that bleed or do not heal
  • Lumps and bumps in the mouth
Read the rest

Cavities are holes in teeth due to tooth decay. They are also known as caries. Two major contributors to tooth decay are bacteria and a diet high in sugar and starch.There are over Five hundred different types of bacteria that are always present in the mouth.

The bacteria mixes with food and saliva to make a sticky substance called plaque, which fastens to teeth. Foods high in starch add to the stickiness of the plaque, which starts to get hard if it remains on the teeth after 1 or 2 days and turns into tartar or calculus deposits. Bacteria in the plaque turn sugar to acid, which dissolves the tooth structure causing holes or cavities. Due to these factors, dental caries have been described as a “dietobacterial” disease. The parts of teeth that are most vulnerable to tooth decay are where plaque can collect most easily. Plaque settles into the pits and fissures in the tops of teeth, into the areas in between the teeth, and next to the gum line. Where there’s plaque, there are bacteria and acid, and eventually damage of the tooth surface.

The cavity starts in the surface layer of the tooth ( enamel ) and as it gets deeper, penetrates into the softer inner layer of the tooth ( dentin. ) In general it’s not until the decay reaches the dentin that you will start to notice signs of the cavity. To understand how a cavity works, we really need to have a better understanding of the anatomy of the tooth. A tooth is composed of a couple layers. The exterior layer ( above the gum-line ) is known as the enamel. Enamel is the strongest and most mineralized substance in the body. Beneath the gum-line, a substance called cementum covers the tooth roots. Under … Read the rest

As temperatures rise, conversations regarding skin cancer become quite frequent. However, cancer prevention is a year round task, and visiting your dentist regularly may catch oral cancer early on in the game. The American Dental Association (ADA) has stated that "… approximately 35,000 new cases of oral cancer are diagnosed each year in the United States." Some 25 percent of those people will die of the disease "and a new dental test can detect oral cancer in its earliest stages.

According to MedicalNewsToday.com, researchers at the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust are working on developing the test. The product will allow dentist to use a brush to harvest cell samples from a patient's oral cavity. The technology is being worked on thanks to funding from a $ 2 million award awarded by the USA's National Institutes of Health.

The yet unspecified test is believed to generate an accurate oral cancer diagnosis in twenty minutes or less. Like other current cancer detection methods, at the present time oral cancer can only be confirmed with a biopsy and lab study. Depending on the location and work queue of the labs, getting the results may take time.

When it comes to any type of cancer, early detection is essential to conquering the disease. Tobacco users (both smokers and chewers), heavy drinkers, sun worshipers and those with a history of oral cancer need to always be on high alert for any suspicious changes in their oral cavity. Thankfully there are visual warning signs of oral cancer including:

  • Pain or numbness in mouth
  • Problems speaking, chewing and swallowing
  • Changes in bite or general tooth health
  • Skin discoloration in the mouth especially patches of red or white
  • Sores that bleed or do not heal
  • Lumps and bumps in the mouth (including
Read the rest

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