A tooth fracture can occur in both the front and back teeth, but the causes differ for each region. The front teeth most often become fractured due to sports trauma or some other external event, and may show signs of mobility due to underlying bone or tissue damage or exhibit damage to the vital tissue known as the pulp.

Posterior teeth often crack or fracture off due to active decay or improperly placed restorations. Although these fractures may not present as urgent an aesthetic problem as those confined to the front teeth, serious damage to both the tooth and supporting structures and tissue can occur without prompt treatment. This article looks at the various type of tooth cracks and how treatment is approached for each.

Superficial Cracks in the Front Teeth

Cracks that occur on the front teeth can be superficial or implicate deeper layers of the tooth. They can occur due to external trauma or natural causes. Tooth structure on either side of the crack is still structurally secure but its integrity can disintegrate with time, evolving into a complete fracture (the sides can break off with little force).

"Craze" lines are an example of a naturally-occurring crack that is confined to the outer enamel layer. Tooth enamel protects the interior layers of the teeth, but can be successfully restored with composite bonding or refinishing of the enamel surface. The same can be said for traumatic injuries to just the enamel.

During composite bonding, the dentist simply etches the tooth and applies a white filling-like material to the crack.

Deeper Cracks in the Front Teeth

Deeper cracks can introduce complications to treatment. If the crack extends into the second layer, known as the dentin, it can still be successfully repaired with composite bonding or an indirect restoration (veneers). The … Read the rest

A tooth fracture can occur in both the front and back teeth, but the causes differ for each region. The front teeth most often become fractured due to sports trauma or some other external event, and may show signs of mobility due to underlying bone or tissue damage or exhibit damage to the vital tissue known as the pulp.

Posterior teeth often crack or fraction off due to active termination or improperly placed restorations. Although these fractures may not present as urgent an aesthetic problem as those bound to the front teeth, serious damage to both the tooth and supporting structures and tissue can occur without prompt treatment. This article looks at the various type of tooth cracks and how treatment is approached for each.

Superficial Cracks in the Front Teeth

Cracks that occur on the front teeth can be privileged or implicate deeper layers of the tooth. They can occur due to external trauma or natural causes. Tooth structure on either side of the crack is still structurally secure but its integrity can disintegrate with time, evolving into a complete fraction (the sides can break off with little force).

"Craze" lines are an example of a naturally-occurring crack that is restricted to the outer enamel layer. Tooth enamel protects the interior layers of the teeth, but can be successfully restored with composite bonding or refinishing of the enamel surface. The same can be said for traumatic injuries to just the enamel.

During composite bonding, the dentist simply etches the tooth and applications a white filling-like material to the crack.

Deeper Cracks in the Front Teeth

Deeper cracks can introduce complications to treatment. If the crack extends into the second layer, known as the dentin, it can still be successfully repaired with composite bonding or an indirect restoration (veneers). The … Read the rest

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